jeudi 24 mars 2011

Modern Photojournalism and the Internet...


The photo published in LeStudio1.com's newsletter to mark the arrival of Spring 2011 has been noticed and the object of small talk because of his element of manipulation by photoshop and the Internet... Each element in the picture is true, but the assembly has created a history and a message that can be suggestive and become fiction.
The comment that caught our attention is the one of a former photographer for Paris Match and one of the Facebook friends of Bernard Bujold (LeStudio1.com), Andre Gordeaux, who criticized the use of the Internet by magazines in general including Paris Match at the expense of heyday when the photographs were printed on film and then on paper.
He is right in one sense because the photo published, among other medias, on the cover of Paris Match was paid only $ 300 by the Agence France Presse to a Japanese newspaper and then distributed to thousands of media around the world, including Match. (See article France 24)
How a photographer can earn a living if you do not pay a fair price for his work?
The image of LeStudio1.com's newsletter has the cover of Polka Magazine on the right side of the picture in front of the newsstand and by doing so, LeStudio1.com wanted to make a nod to this new reality of photojournalism.
Indeed, the founder and owner of the magazine Polka is Alain Genestar, the former editor chief of Paris Match, who was abruptly "expelled" from the magazine following the publishing of a photo of the ex-wife to Nicolas Sarkozi with his lover in New York. If the photo had been purchased from an agency, Alain Genestar would perhaps not have the problems that he has known ...
The conclusion to the debate is that yes the photojournalism has changed and today the final image is a virtual assembly where each element represents a real reality but assembled by publishers behind a computer screen and then distributed on the internet to every wind, for free. Is it better journalism? It's faster and it's universal but the life of the stories is proportionally reduced.
As the Japanese woman in the photo shows resilience out of the ordinary, journalists and photographers must necessarily adapt and rediscover life as no coming back will never be possible.
Indeed, talk to victims of Japan; to the rebels in Libya or the revolutionaries of Egypt. Their story has become universal but is already beginning to be forgotten. It is both resilience but also "forget easy" due to the abundance of the Internet.
It remains, however, as said Bernard Bujold, that we are deeply missing Alain Genestar and his editorials in Paris Match, but hey, we also say: "Those were the days ... "
Voir article au sujet de la photo FRANCE 24 ;
Voir magazine Paris Match ;
Voir magazine Polka ;
Voir livre Alain Genestar -EXPULSION ;
Voir site LeStudio1.com ;

1 commentaire: